The benefits of sanctions on Russia – Uzbekistan

I found this article interesting. It is especially thought provoking on how we, in the West, think we are ‘right’ to impose sanctions and our standards on other nations.

But lately Uzbekistan, like other Central Asian countries, are experiencing a mini-boom – a boom thanks to the sanctions imposed on Russia by Washington and through extension by its European vassals. Her exports of vegetables, fruit, other agricultural and industrial goods to Russia are skyrocketing. Mr. Putin already said two years ago, the sanctions were the best thing that ever happened to Russia since the collapse of the Soviet Union. They forced Russia to develop their agriculture again and bring her defunct industrial apparatus with science and research up to cutting edge technology, at par or above that of the west. They have certainly succeeded and by association, the sanctions have benefitted Uzbeks and other Central-Asians by improving their standards of living by supplying goods and services to Russia, while Russia’s capacity is growing stronger.

What is the opposite of collateral damage? Collateral benefits?

Our West, hammers on about human ‘rights’ whilst they meddle, promote and interfere with other countries. We are shameful? Seems we are!

The western populace lives in a bubble in which their values are enshrined as the truth – all the wars and conflicts started by the west, the so called war on terror, based on a ‘false flag’ 9/11, is justifying any human rights abuse, wars, CIA assassinations, drone killings, financial strangulations by ‘sanctions’ abject torture, raping and slaughtering entire countries, like the central African countries, for natural resources, rare earths used for the military-security industrial complex that needs an ever-mounting spiral of wars and conflicts for ever more and higher profits by an economy of death and destruction – which is what we have become in the west. ‘Fake news’ also makes Uzbekistan a country that allegedly supplies terrorists, like the recent downtown Manhattan sidewalk rampage, supposedly carried out by an Uzbek national.

Yet, hardly anybody in the west sees the context of western aggression, when they launch accusations of human rights abuse against Russia, China, Iran, Syria, Venezuela, Cuba, Uzbekistan – and the list goes on. It is beyond comprehension how blind our media have made us in the west – to the point that truth seeking media, like Russia Today (RT), Sputnik, TeleSur – are shunned, if not outright banned in the west, i.e. in the US of A and its European puppets and in some of the newly converted neoliberal Latin American countries.

Uzbekistan, China, Russia and the entire East is doing great as far as human rights are concerned – there is not even a shred of comparison with the abusive, murderous west.

Time for introspection? Yes.

LINK

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Worth watching – brilliant minds – Paglia and Peterson

Dr. Camille Paglia is a well-known American intellectual and social critic. She has been a professor at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (where this discussion took place) since 1984. She is the author of seven books focusing on literature, visual art, music, and film history, among other topics. The most well-known of these is Sexual Personae (http://amzn.to/2xVGEEV), an expansion of her highly original doctoral thesis at Yale. The newest, Free Women, Free Men: Sex, Gender, Feminism, was published by Pantheon Books in March 2017 (http://amzn.to/2hGycTG). Dr. Paglia has been warning about the decline and corruption of the modern humanities for decades, and she is a serious critic of the postmodern ethos that currently dominates much of academia. Although she is a committed equity feminist, she firmly opposes the victim/oppressor narrative that dominates much of modern American and British feminism. In this wide-ranging discussion, we cover (among other topics) the pernicious influence of the French intellectuals of the 1970’s on the American academy, the symbolic utility of religious tradition, the tendency toward intellectual conformity and linguistic camouflage among university careerists, the under-utilization of Carl Jung and his student, Erich Neumann, in literary criticism and the study of the humanities, and the demolition of the traditional roles and identity of men and women in the West.